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Southern Ireland.

Peter and I outside Kilkenny Castle. - Ireland

Peter and I outside Kilkenny Castle. - Ireland

Ireland.

I travelled to Southern Ireland in August 2004 with my husband and two close friends that we used to holiday with a lot. Our friends brought their car over with them so we drove around. Our friends had more time than us so they started their holiday in Northern Ireland visiting Belfast and the County Antrim coastline, which they told us was stunningly beautiful. Another place we must get to some time. We joined them in the airport at Dublin which we flew to using Ryan Air. Our original plan had been to stay for a couple of nights in Dublin, but instead, because it was cheaper and quieter, we ended up staying a couple of nights in Skerries. Skerries is a fishing town with a long sandy beach located about 31KM north of Dublin. We had a look around the town on our first day and next day travelled into Dublin stopping at various coastal towns we liked the look of on the way. One of the places we stopped at was Howth. Howth had a wonderful harbour which looked out towards a large island and an old ruined church. Dublin was an interesting city, but I do not feel we had sufficient time to see it properly - another place to be revisited. We spent some of our time here on an organized tour known as The Rebellion Walk which tells the story of the 1916 Easter Rising. It was a very interesting and informative walk. On the walk I remember visiting St Stephen's Green and the Post Office building. Later in the day we visited Dublin Castle, Trinity College, Christ Church Cathedral and the River Liffey.

The next part of our holiday involved us travelling down to Cork and staying there for a couple of nights. We went via Clonmel which we had a quick look at. Cork was a pleasant, relaxed place with great pubs. Each evening we visited the pub that was providing live music. The atmosphere of a real Irish pub is wonderful and puts fake Irish pubs all over the world to shame. We also visited Cork's historic gaol and drove to Kinsale and Cobh. Cobh was a beautiful place. It was the last port of call of the Titanic. After leaving Cork we visited Kilkenny and on the way there stopped off at the Rock of Cashel to visit its wonderful historic remains. Our time in Kilkenny was too short to do it full justice. I just remember visiting its lovely castle.

Skerries.

Skerries is a seaside town about 31KM north of Dublin. Its name comes from the Irish word for rocks. We used Skerries as a base from which to visit Dublin and the coastline near Dublin. Skerries was a pleasant place with a very long sandy beach. It also had an old stone tower and some windmills. It felt like an old-fashioned, traditional type of seaside resort. The sort of place I remember as a child and forever associate with sand, sea, buckets and spades, candy floss, fish and chips and donkey rides on the beach.

Our friends at the beach, Skerries. - Ireland

Our friends at the beach, Skerries. - Ireland

The beach, Skerries. - Ireland

The beach, Skerries. - Ireland

Howth Harbour.

We stopped off in Howth on our drive into Dublin because we were impressed by its beautiful harbour. It was filled with lots and lots of boats. Opposite the harbour there is an unihabited island known as Ireland's Eye. Apparently Howth has a castle, but we did not have time to visit it.

Howth and Ireland's Eye. - Ireland

Howth and Ireland's Eye. - Ireland

Howth Harbour. - Ireland

Howth Harbour. - Ireland

Howth's Ruined Church.

As well as having an impressive harbour, Howth also had a lovely old ruined church. The church is called Saint Mary's Abbey Church and is located on Abbey Street. The church was founded by the St.Lawrence family in the early 1200s. This church is the burial place of Christopher St.Lawrence, 1st Baron of Howth and Christopher St.Lawrence, 7th Baron of Howth.

Ruined church in Howth. - Ireland

Ruined church in Howth. - Ireland

Dublin.

Dublin is Ireland's capital and its largest city. We did not really have long enough to do full justice to Dublin, so I think a future visit is called for. We spent a couple of hours on a guided walk - Rebellion Walk which told the story of the 1916 Easter Rising. This was interesting and worthwhile. We also visited Dublin Castle, Trinity College, the River Liffey and Christchurch Cathedral.

Dublin Castle. - Ireland

Dublin Castle. - Ireland

Peter outside Trinity college, Dublin. - Ireland

Peter outside Trinity college, Dublin. - Ireland

Christchurch Cathedral, Dublin. - Ireland

Christchurch Cathedral, Dublin. - Ireland

Clonmel.

We just stopped briefly in Clonmel on our drive down to Cork. Clonmel means honey vale. It is the largest town in County Tipperary in Ireland. It is situated on the banks of the River Suir. We looked at the river, the old bridge and an old building called the main guard which dates from 1810. Bulmers cider is brewed in Clonmel.

The Main Guard, Clonmel. - Ireland

The Main Guard, Clonmel. - Ireland

Peter in Clonmel. - Ireland

Peter in Clonmel. - Ireland

Clonmel. - Ireland

Clonmel. - Ireland

Cork.

We stayed in Cork for a couple of nights. My main memory is of its pubs. We went to a different pub every night always choosing the one with live music and it was really good fun. All the pubs had a great atmosphere. Also remember visiting An Bodhran Bar on Oliver Plunkett Street which had Thin Lizzy memorabilia all over the walls, Cork is on the River Lee. The city has lots of bridges across the river. While in Cork we visited Cork gaol and Fitzgerald Park in the rain. We enjoyed crossing the shaky bridge into the park.

Irish pubs are great. This one's in Cork. - Ireland

Irish pubs are great. This one's in Cork. - Ireland

Cork Gaol. - Ireland

Cork Gaol. - Ireland

River Lee. - Ireland

River Lee. - Ireland

Shaky Bridge. - Ireland

Shaky Bridge. - Ireland

Cobh.

One of the most beautiful places we visited in Ireland was Cobh - a port city close to Cork. Cobh is filled with colourful houses and its skyline is dominated by St Colman's Cathedral, the tallest church in Ireland. Cobh has experienced several maritime tragedies. In 1915 the Lusitania was torpedoed by the Germans near Cobh. 1,200 people lost their lives in this tragic event. Many of them are buried in a churchyard in Cobh. A monument in the centre of town commemorates this terrible event. Cobh was also the last port of call of the Titanic before it struck an iceberg and sunk in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean. There is a bar in town called after the ill-fated liner.

Titanic Bar, Cobh. - Ireland

Titanic Bar, Cobh. - Ireland

Titanic Bar, Cobh. - Ireland

Titanic Bar, Cobh. - Ireland

Cobh Town Hall. - Ireland

Cobh Town Hall. - Ireland

The Commodore Hotel, Cobh. - Ireland

The Commodore Hotel, Cobh. - Ireland

Monument to Victims of the Lusitania. - Ireland

Monument to Victims of the Lusitania. - Ireland

The Rock of Cashel.

Another very beautiful place we visited on this trip was the Rock of Cashel. According to legend, the Rock of Cashel was formed when St. Patrick banished Satan from a cave and converted the Kings of Munster to Christianity. The Rock of Cashel was the traditional seat of the kings of Munster for several centuries. Most of the current buildings at the Rock of Cashel date from the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. The oldest building is the round tower which is ninety feet high and dates from around 1100. Cormac's Chapel was once the chapel of King Cormac Mac Carthaigh. It dates from 1127. The Cathedral of Cashel was built between 1235 and 1270. The Rock of Cashel was attacked by Cromwell in 1647. Its religious buildings were desecrated and around three thousand of its occupants were slaughtered.

The Rock of Cashel - Ireland

The Rock of Cashel - Ireland

View from The Rock of Cashel - Ireland

View from The Rock of Cashel - Ireland

The magnificent Rock of Cashel. - Ireland

The magnificent Rock of Cashel. - Ireland

Peter at The Rock of Cashel - Ireland

Peter at The Rock of Cashel - Ireland

Kilkenny.

Our last night before leaving Ireland was spent in Kilkenny. Our stay here was short, but we did manage to visit the beautiful Kilkenny Castle. Kilkenny Castle stands dramatically on the River Nore. The original castle was built for William Marshal, 4th Earl of Pembroke at the beginning of the thirteenth century. Kilkenny Castle later became home to the rich and powerful Butler family who lived here for almost six hundred years.

Kilkenny Castle - Ireland

Kilkenny Castle - Ireland

Kilkenny Castle - Ireland

Kilkenny Castle - Ireland

Kilkenny Castle - Ireland

Kilkenny Castle - Ireland

Posted by irenevt 07:38 Archived in Ireland

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Comments

Looks like you had pretty good weather for Ireland. Congratulations.

by Beausoleil

Hi Sally, yes we mainly had good weather though it rained during our visit to Cork. Only been to Ireland once. Must also visit northern Ireland some day.

by irenevt

Well done, Irene! It's always fun to read your pages! Happy trails!

by Vic_IV

You too, Victor.

by irenevt

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